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The Contentment Challenge

The best part of being an adult is earning proper money. You can’t convince me otherwise; when I compare my childhood to my adulthood, the key difference is that I can now buy myself a tin of Danish cookies as often as I like πŸ™‚

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And I can now buy myself a host of other things. Stuck as I am in this limbo where I earn money but don’t have corresponding responsibilities (no family yet), it’s an incredibly liberating feeling. I can literally buy myself anything I want. If it’s expensive, I just need to save up and it’s mine. Awesome.

And unnerving. I consider myself a rational person, not given to frivolous purchases or impulse shopping. When I was younger, I learnt the importance of buying things on an as-needed basis. New books? Because I needed them for school. Handbag? Because I needed to carry my stuff around. New sweater? The old one had holes in it. Having a small allowance made this prioritization a must.

But I’ve noticed things have changed. About a month ago, I bought a bunch of books. Not a bad idea, except that I had 3 new books that I hadn’t read yet. And just yesterday, I was contemplating buying a new pair of sneakers. But the sneakers I own now are just about a year old and in good condition. Then there was the matter of the rust-coloured slouch tote. But again, I already have 2 slouch totes and a red bag that are in fabulous condition. And more bags to boot!

The Coveted Bag

I went through my wish-list and realized that everything I want now, I already have a functioning substitute for. I have enough shoes, I have enough bags, I have books I have not read, I have enough sweaters, and jeans, and jackets, and make-up, and gadgets andΒ jewelry. And it doesn’t matter if I can afford ten more, I don’t need ’em.

I’m trying to internalize this. Yes, I have a savings account but there isn’t a limit to what I can save. I don’t have to spend all of the shopping budget I allow myself if I don’t need new stuff. Heck, if I feel I have money to splurge, I could give it to someone who needs it badly, yes? So this is my commitment. To not buy things I don’t need. No new sneakers till this pair wears out!Β 

I hope I last the year. Wish me luck. πŸ™‚

0 Comments

  1. “…when I compare my childhood to my adulthood, the key difference is that I can now buy myself a tin of Danish cookies as often as I like.” Ah, I feel you! From the moment my dad crossed out certain items from my ‘provision’ list, financial independence became a worthy goal.

    I wish you Godspeed in your quest. Not an easy one because of the feverish advertising all around you that make things cry out, “Osemhen, buy me! Buy me!” πŸ™‚

    • “Osemhen, you need these boots. Look how nice they are. XYZ has a pair, remember how nice they looked with her skirt! Just buy them!”

    • Lol. I also want to try and extend the commitment to the snacks I allow myself. Do I really need a pack of Fox’s Chunkies? Lol.

  2. *singing* We spending Arab money (or the other kind of money from where Arabs make their money).
    Biko, give to charity
    P.S. My middle name is Charity πŸ˜€

  3. “I can literally buy myself anything I want. If it’s expensive, I just need to save up and it’s mine. Awesome.”

    I happen to be saving up for a private jet πŸ™‚
    wish me luck!

  4. Mercy says

    Hahahahahaha…. All the best with that, don’t forget the attendant parking charges, save up for those too…

  5. Mercy says

    I know exactly what you mean…and I am the queen of impulse buying…hahahahahaha! All the best with lasting through the year…a good thing the year has almost ended.

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